Clinical Dashboard can be A Powerful Medication Management Tool

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Some recent studies state that clinical dashboards can be much powerful medication management tool in various aspects, such as:

Tackling TNF Inhibitors

The new technology-based real-time clinical dashboard can very much assist in monitoring patients taking tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitor drugs. This can save around $302,000 per year to Durham Veterans Affairs Health Care System. It can also help in improving medication adherence and patient safety.

In 2019, the pilot project began. Pharmacists during the pilot project at the health system reviewed patients lab values for safety before they were starting with these therapies, however, pharmacists were not involved in any needed long term monitoring for safety and adherence, said lead study author Anna Hu, PharmD, BCPS, a drug information specialist in University of Texas Medical Branch, Huntsville.

The clinical dashboard will able to capture high-risk patients. The patients with any active or recently expired outpatients’ prescriptions or IV orders for adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab were put in this program.

Staying in Lane during COVID-19

Several hospital managements are experiencing a COVID-19 surge which may be overwhelmed by the increase in drug utilization for many agents, including sedatives and vasopressors. In a poster presented at the ASHP 2020 Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exposition, pharmacists from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) explained and described that a daily dashboard they developed can evaluate the use of key agents which are required for managing COVID-19 patients.

They are trying to access many different sources of data including automated dispensing cabinets and pooling all the data that certain pharmacy departments are not able to do.

The clinical dashboard after implemented was able to allow multiple medication distribution shifts throughout the day mainly for COVID-19. It also allowed them to predict how many medications they will be required to prepare beforehand in the IV room every day.